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Natasha Udu-gama

Nov 20, 2014
04:42

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Thanks for your proposal! A couple of questions that immediately spring to my mind, for your consideration: 1. How common is it to use video/board games in this region of the world? 2. How inclusive is video/board game playing of all community perspectives?

Morgan Ruelle

Nov 24, 2014
11:36

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Those are great questions - I'll share this conversation with a friend from Tajikistan to get feedback.

Murodbek Laldjebaev

Nov 25, 2014
11:05

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Thanks Morgan. To respond to Natashau's questions, board games are not as popular in mountain communities of Tajikistan. Two most popular games are checkers and dominoes, which are legacies of the Soviet Union - not traditional games. Traditional games are mostly active outdoor games. I should also point out that engaging in agro-pastoral livelihood activities leaves very little time, if any, for recreation. As for video games, access not only to technology but energy (electricity) is a big obstacle. In a nutshell, while this is an interesting idea to use games, it may not be as practical and contextually relevant, in my opinion.

Natasha Udu-gama

Nov 25, 2014
01:17

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Thank you for your response, murodbek.From your response, the lifestyle and resources in that region of the world are not particularly suited for gaming in either form. However, might this vary from community to community?

Morgan Ruelle

Nov 25, 2014
05:35

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Hey Murodbek, are there slow times during the winter when people might enjoy playing a game? Does anyone anyone play backgammon (nard)? It's so popular in the Caucasus, and I can imagine it being the basis for a game using counting of days on body parts. The pattern of pieces circling the board is kind of similar to the movement of the sun up and down the body in the calendars.

Jesse Himmelstein

Nov 26, 2014
04:28

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Proposal
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Interesting comments. If time is so limited, perhaps we could work on short games that are played at regular intervals over a longer period of time.

Karim-aly Kassam

Dec 5, 2014
12:15

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Dear Himmelattack, The idea of game is very creative and relevant. Think about the game connected to the cell/mobile phone. This approach can create a meaningful contribution because everybody uses a cell phone despite electricity constraints. Now imagine the camera that usually accompanies the most simple mobile phones and the text messaging capabilities (although young people have very sophisticated phones in the region). This gives us ample opportunities to engage widely with interested players. Now let us think about the game itself. When we normally think of games, we think of fantasy, but what if the game was based and engaged on ecological facts. Where the camera and the text capabilities enable engagement with a wide variety of people while transmitting valuable information that is current and time-specific. This would be a very meaningful contribution to calibrating the calender of the the human body to current weather and ecological context.

Morgan Ruelle

Mar 4, 2015
05:13

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Hi Himmelattack, I wanted to let you know that Climate CoLab as expanded the 'Summary' field to 4000 characters so that you can incorporate some of these new ideas into your proposal. I hope that helps! Best, Morgan

Gabriel Harp

Mar 31, 2015
04:42

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Given the ubiquitous use of many mobile devices, there could be a relatively low-cost way to gather insights about the timing of phenological events from different locales. Adding a gameful element could it fun and a source of social gain, not just an "ecologically motivated" task. Trading free minutes for precise data would something that most mobile users could contribute to easily and get a modest return. In the area where I live, many elderly women make a modest income from collecting and returning recyclable materials found on the streets. Even with a small financial return, many microcontributions can add up quickly.

Gabriel Harp

Apr 15, 2015
07:27

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Here is a calendar-based board game that has some of the elements of the challenge. http://riograndegames.com/Game/424-Tzolkin--the-Mayan-Calendar The rule book is here and offers more details: http://riograndegames.com/getFile.php?id=624

Natasha Udu-gama

Apr 17, 2015
09:25

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Hi himmelattack, 29 days until this contest ends! At this point, I would encourage you to start fine-tuning your proposal. We now have an amazing set of judges from the National Consortium for Atmospheric Research (Dr. Greg Holland), The University of Maryland (Dr. Surya Sharma), College of the Atlantic (Dr. Doreen Stabinsky) and The Lowlander Center (Dr. Kristina Peterson) not to mention, our two esteemed advisors. Please see: https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1301102. I hope your proposal will wow them! Best of luck! Natasha

Morgan Ruelle

Apr 26, 2015
12:20

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20 days left to iron out your proposal! Don’t forget to share with your networks to maximize discussion before the deadline! Click on "Share conversation" at the top of this page!

Morgan Ruelle

May 1, 2015
09:20

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15 days left to ensure all content on your proposal is as detailed and accurate as possible! Share your proposal on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or send an email to colleagues asking for comments on your ideas!

Morgan Ruelle

May 13, 2015
06:29

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3 days left until the judges will read through your proposal! Take this chance to invite others to weigh-in and ensure your proposal is as comprehensive and accurate as possible! Now is the time to make any last minute changes!