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Climate Colab

Aug 5, 2014
08:29

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Quite a bit of text and the figures is devoted to the rationale and the vision for a shift from professional responses to the affected community having a function. That function seems to be limited to information. In reality, the affected community is heavily involved in the first few hours of response. The timing of response to disasters isn't captured here and thus the benefits of more information may be overstated. Parts of the proposal are well developed--technical issues of bandwidth and costs for example. There are many examples of community involvement through social medias and other ICT. How your proposal differentiates itself from what is already done? How does it helps to alleviate current limits and barrier to community involvement? This proposition would benefit from more details on the cloud infrastructure, the PSA, and the management of the data collected.

Victor Blanco

Aug 26, 2014
03:50

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I wish you the best! Please, check my proposal in Waste Management Contest, named "REACC: Recycled Debris for Adaptation to Climate Change"; and I would apreciate your support as I supported your proposal.

Climate Colab

Sep 3, 2014
12:23

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Interesting but is based on an assumption that "information" is all that's needed for effective response operations. Information is important but by no means the only part. Capacity to respond has more to do with just having the right contextual information. The proposal also assumes that response agencies know little about the affected areas and only those living in those areas do and can provide such information. Keep in mind that anything that relies on SmartPhones or indeed mobile or web based technology could also come down in the case of a disaster that affects the physical infrastructure on which such technology works. Capacity to respond in the Golden 48 Hours in any Search and Rescue Operation has more to do with logistical and management as well as mobilisation as much as having the right kind of information. Absolute accuracy isn't an issue in disaster response. Crowd sourcing proved useful and viable in risk reduction and disseminating information on safe practices as well as monitoring changes in behaviour and practice for example. The way the proposal puts it here begs many questions on application in the aftermath of an event.
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