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I would like to suggest that we as authors begin to build an open library of green grant and green bond resources and knowledge.


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I would like to suggest that we as authors begin to build an open library of green grant and green bond resources and knowledge. This could be done by simply posting green grant/bond information in a dummy proposal space which would be set up to be modified by all.

I'll start such an effort and I hope it is both a help to the other authors as well as a place to deposit knowledge which we can all use. If we can keep this library moving from one challenge to another and do so for years, the funding knowledge base could evolve into a powerful tool.


Which proposals are included in your plan and how do they fit together?

The below list of green funding options is excerpted from: Working Draft Of The  iWENN © Management Series of Proposals and is offered as a starting effort towards building an extensive green funding library of knowledge. Please feel free to use what is here and post additional funding options.

 

6.1.1)The Green Climate Fund:

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"..the Fund will promote the paradigm shift towards low-emission and climate-resilient development pathways by providing support to developing countries to limit or reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt to the impacts of climate change, taking into account the needs of those developing countries particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change.".

                       Fig 20

6.1.2) "The wheels of climate finance are turning: the Green Climate Fund (GCF) will soon start distributing funds through 7 institutions.".

"The accredited institutions include the following:

  • Centre de suivi écologique (CSE) from Senegal, which focuses on combating desertification and protecting coastal areas. In 2010, CSE was the first national institution to be accredited and to implement a project through the Adaptation Fund , the first international climate fund to take the pioneering step of accrediting developing country institutions.

  • Fondo de Promoción de las Áreas Naturales Protegidas del Péru (PROFONANPE) that specializes in funding biodiversity conservation and managing protected areas. Like CSE, PROFONANPE is also accredited to the Adaptation Fund.

  • the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP), an intergovernmental organization of Pacific Island countries and territories, based in Samoa, which focuses on protection and sustainable development of the Pacific region’s environment

  • the Acumen Fund, Inc. (Acumen), a well-respected private venture capital fund that invests in developing country entrepreneurs and businesses working to alleviate poverty and advance sustainable development. The social impact investment fund works on improving the lives of low income communities in Africa and Asia, especially in healthcare, agriculture and clean energy.

“Three international organizations were also accredited: the Asian Development Bank (ADB), Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW), and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).".

6.1.3) The Asian Development Bank-Climate Change Fund:

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“The CCF was established in May 2008 to facilitate greater investment in developing member countries (DMCs) to effectively address the causes and consequences of climate change. The CCF is a key mechanism for pooling resources within ADB to address climate change through technical assistance (TA) and grant components of investment projects.”.

6.1.4)Climate Investment Funds

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“Our Funds & Programs

THE CLIMATE INVESTMENT FUNDS ARE A UNIQUE SET OF FINANCING INSTRUMENTS THAT GIVE DEVELOPING COUNTRIES AN URGENTLY NEEDED JUMP-START TOWARD ACHIEVING CLIMATE-SMART DEVELOPMENT. THE CIF IS DESIGNED TO DELIVER STRONG DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES AS WELL AS STRONG CLIMATE OUTCOMES. THROUGH TWO DISTINCT FUNDS IMPLEMENTED BY THE MDBS, THE CIF SUPPORT DEVELOPING COUNTRIES’ EFFORTS TO MITIGATE AND MANAGE THE CHALLENGES OF CLIMATE CHANGE BY PROVIDING GRANTS, CONCESSIONAL FUNDS, AND RISK MITIGATION INSTRUMENTS THAT LEVERAGE SIGNIFICANT FINANCING FROM THE PRIVATE SECTOR, MDBS, AND OTHER SOURCES.”.

 

6.1.5)Homeland Security Grants

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"Strengthen national preparedness and resilience, building a ready and resilient Nation, with the ability to plan, prepare for, and respond to disasters. Proposals for climate resilience coupled with a restructured DHS grant program will help create robust national preparedness capabilities.".

6.1.6)Large-scale Aquaponics Project - Optimized Food and Water Management

 

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“The aquaponics system for (nearly) emission free tomato- and fish production in greenhouses, abbreviated “ASTAF-PRO”, provides ideal growth conditions for both fishes and vegetables at the same time – a challenge that traditional aquaponics systems cannot overcome. “ASTAF-PRO” is ASTAF-PRO is the technological basis for INAPRO, the “Innovative model & demonstration based water management for resource efficiency in integrated multitrophic agriculture and aquaculture systems. It aims at achieving a real breakthrough towards implementation and commercialization of this technology.”.

6.2) In the Green Bond investment space, a growing number of important market funding paths are being developed. Guidelines for such market based funding are currently being developed. Such as:

6.2.1)Green Bond Principles 2014: Voluntary Process Guidelines for Issuing Green Bonds:

(Per CERES) “Green Bonds enable capital-raising and investment for new and existing projects with environmental benefits. Recent activity indicates that the market for Green Bonds is developing rapidly. The Green Bond Principles (GBP) are voluntary process guidelines that recommend transparency and disclosure and promote integrity in the development of the Green Bond market by clarifying the approach for issuance of a Green Bond. The GBP are intended for broad use by the market: they provide issuers guidance on the key components involved in launching a credible Green Bond; they aid investors by ensuring availability of information necessary to evaluate the environmental impact of their Green Bond investments; and they assist underwriters by moving the market towards standard disclosures which will facilitate transactions.”.

6.2.2)  World Bank Green Bond

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"Funding for new technologies that permit significant reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.".

6.2.2a)‘Conservation Bonds’ Take Green Financing to the Next Level

"Green bonds, as described by the World Bank, “are fixed income, liquid financial instruments that are used to raise funds dedicated to climate-mitigation, adaptation, and other environment-friendly projects.” When issued by multilateral institutions such as the World Bank, or agencies of national governments such as the German Development Bank, such bonds may carry low, or even concessionary interest rates. Furthermore, a number of private financial institutions, attracted by the reliable returns on projects financed by green bonds, have entered the marketplace.”.

“The Green Bond market is rapidly growing. First issued by the World Bank in 2007, the green bond market grew to “The Green Bond market is rapidly growing. First issued by the World Bank in 2007, the green bond market grew to $11 billion in 2013. As reported by the World Bank, some $32 billion of green bonds have been issued by multilaterals, governments and corporate issuers from January through October 2014, and could surpass $40 billion for the year.". 1 billion in 2013. As reported by the World Bank, some $32 billion of green bonds have been issued by multilaterals, governments and corporate issuers from January through October 2014, and could surpass $40 billion for the year.".

6.2.3)"Transforming the Traditional Municipal Bond Market to Finance Environment-Friendly Green Projects"

"In 2013 Massachusetts became the first state in the U.S. municipal bond market to issue these so-called green bonds.  The offering was so successful that Massachusetts tripled the volume of green bonds offered in 2014, selling $350 million in bonds to individual and institutional investors this month. According to Massachusetts Treasury officials, the demand for green bonds far outpaced the supply.”.

6.2.4)Climate Bond Initiative:

"Green bonds were created to fund projects that have positive environmental and/or climate benefits. The majority of the green bonds issued are green “use of proceeds” or asset-linked bonds. Proceeds from these bonds are earmarked for green projects but are backed by the issuer’s entire balance sheet. There have also been green "use of proceeds" revenue bonds, green project bonds and green securitized bonds.".

6.2.5)  Clean Trillion

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                                      Fig 22http://www.ceres.org/issues/clean-trillion

“In order to limit global warming to 2°C and avoid the worst effects of climate change, the world needs to invest an additional $44 trillion in clean energy—more than In order to limit global warming to 2°C and avoid the worst effects of climate change, the world needs to invest an additional $44 trillion in clean energy—more than $1 trillion per year for the next 36 years. trillion per year for the next 36 years.

Ceres is calling this clean energy investment goal the Clean Trillion. Meeting this goal will be a tremendous challenge, but it is possible if businesses, investors and policymakers join forces.”.

6.3) In the phylanthropic Green Grant space, a number of emerging programs are found. Such as:

6.3.1) "Major International Research Initiative Launched to Improve Food Security for Developing Countries - Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation."

"Listening to farmers and addressing their specific needs. We talk to farmers about the crops they want to grow and eat, as well as the unique challenges they face. We partner with organizations that understand and are equipped to address these challenges, and we invest in research to identify relevant and affordable solutions that farmers want and will use.

  • Increasing farm productivity.

  • Fostering sustainable agricultural practices.

  • Achieving greater impact with partners.

 

6.3.2)Global Greengrants Fund

 

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“Our mission

To mobilize on-the-ground resources to fight environmental degradation, promote sustainability, and support social justice around the world.”.

 

6.4) Increasingly, there are a number of cities coming together to develop ‘decentralized cooperation’ relationships focused upon climate change mitigation/adaptation.The primary example of this phenomenon is:   Cities for Climate Protection program

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(Wikipedia)“The Cities for Climate Protection program (CCP) is one of three major global transnational municipal networks aimed at reducing urban greenhouse gas emissions. Established in 1990 by the International Union of Local Authorities and the United Nations Environment Programme, one of the largest global transnational networks, the International Council for Local Environment Initiatives (ICLEI), presented a framework to represent local government environmental concerns internationally.[1] The ICLEI strives to ‘establish an active and committed municipal membership… that promotes environmental and sustainable development initiatives within…[a] framework of decentralised cooperation’.[2] ). In 1993, Subsequent to an ICLEI successful pilot scheme, the Urban CO2 Reduction Project, the CCP program was established during the post-Rio Earth Summit era. The CCP program illustrates itself within local climate policy, as a Transnational governance network.”.

The Pilot Asia-Pacific Climate Technology Network and Finance Center

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) are working in partnership with co-funding from the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the governments of Japan and Republic of Korea, and VITO-Flemish Institute for Technological Research NV to pilot a climate technology finance center in Manila, managed by ADB, and a climate technology network secretariat in Bangkok, managed by UNEP. These pilot institutions will directly address key barriers to climate technology transfer and deployment in Asia and the Pacific.


Explanation of the emissions scenario calculated in the Impact tab

Below is a continuation of the above.

UN Secretary-General’s initiative aims to strengthen climate resilience of the world’s most vulnerable countries and people

"The private sector also has an important role to play, for example, Global Adaptation and Resilience Investment Working Group, launched by Siguler Guff & Co., will mobilize private sector investment in climate adaptation and resilience.  The Working Group is evaluating the potential for a The private sector also has an important role to play, for example, Global Adaptation and Resilience Investment Working Group, launched by Siguler Guff & Co., will mobilize private sector investment in climate adaptation and resilience.  The Working Group is evaluating the potential for a $1 billion investment vehicle that could invest in both developed and developing countries around climate adaptation and resilience.  ING has committed to allocate at least 20 per cent of the proceeds from the issuance of a five-year EUR 500 million and three-year US$800 million green bond to fund new projects, including for resilience. billion investment vehicle that could invest in both developed and developing countries around climate adaptation and resilience.  ING has committed to allocate at least 20 per cent of the proceeds from the issuance of a five-year EUR 500 million and three-year US$800 million green bond to fund new projects, including for resilience."

Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation 


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