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Ggg Ggg

Apr 18, 2015
09:30

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Great concept! Good luck

Temba Msezane

Apr 27, 2015
10:42

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A leap for ‘artificial leaf’ New technique could open door to producing alternative-energy devices more cheaply http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2015/04/a-leap-for-artificial-leaf/ Adding transparency to graphene paper improves supercapacitor capacitance The material's combination of flexibility, transparency, electrical conductivity, and large surface area open the doors to many new potential applications, such as stretchable and transparent solar cells Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-04-adding-transparency-graphene-paper-supercapacitor.html#jCp http://phys.org/news/2015-04-adding-transparency-graphene-paper-supercapacitor.html

Patrick Ray

Jun 2, 2015
04:07

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Temba, Here is an article I found online that helped me understand better the advantages and disadvantages of hydrogen energy: http://www.conserve-energy-future.com/Advantages_Disadvantages_HydrogenEnergy.php I think it would be useful if you demonstrated, 1 by 1, how your proposed innovation makes progress with each of the disadvantages. It is difficult for me to discern exactly what innovation you are proposing. It seems that you are suggesting that you can utilize recent breakthroughs in technology for harnessing the power of light to generate hydrogen fuel. Is this an innovation of yours, or are you proposing to apply that breakthrough in a new way, to cars in particular? It will be important to show that this is affordable, and there is no mention of affordability or mass-applicability in your proposal. The artificial leaf technology is in its infancy. Is it ready for mass adoption? Have car makers considered this already? What is the status of the opinions of major car manufacturers to hydrogen fuel? I have not heard any news. They seem to be moving forward with electric cars... And I'm not sure what the connection is to water resources. You imply it in the beginning, but then do not make clear how this fits the nexus. It would be good if you could make the nexus argument clearer. Keep it up. I'll check back in.

Stevie Harison

Jun 12, 2015
04:24

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Hello from Indonesia, Good luck for your project proposal. Just review and make it completed before meet deadline tomorrow. Thank you,

Temba Msezane

Jul 15, 2015
09:44

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New method can make cheaper solar energy storage A photograph of a single-flake-layer WSe2 thin film deposited on flexible Sn:In2O3 (ITO)-coated PET plastic. Credit: Kevin Sivula / EPFL Read more at - http://phys.org/news/2015-06-method-cheaper-solar-energy-storage.html The thin film produced like this was tested and found to be superior in efficiency to films made with the same material but using other comparable methods. At this proof-of-concept stage, the solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency was around 1%—already a vast improvement over thin films prepared by other methods, and with considerable potential for higher efficiencies in the future. More importantly, this liquid-liquid method can be scaled up on a commercial level. "It is suitable for rapid and large-area roll-to-roll processing," says Kevin Sivula. "Considering the stability of these materials and the comparative ease of our deposition method, this represents an important advance towards economical solar-to-fuel energy conversion." _______________________________________________ For those that would like more scientific rigor to the feasibility and our ability to execute the idea please contact me as we feel confident that our proposed "solar bottle" can be produced economically today and provide a clean, portable global solution. The "personal energy" for mobility and residential use.

Temba Msezane

Jul 21, 2015
10:48

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So the researchers tried producing a grid of tiny gallium phosphide nanowires measuring 90 nanometres thick and 500 nanometers long, and integrated them with existing solar cell technology. Not only did they end up using 10,000 less gallium phosphide than if they’d used it to build a flat surface, but they discovered a whole new way to make solar fuel. "This immediately boosted the yield of hydrogen by a factor of 10 to 2.9 percent http://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-figure-out-how-to-make-solar-cells-produce-fuel-and-electricity Scientists figure out how to make solar cells produce fuel AND electricity

Temba Msezane

Jul 22, 2015
09:52

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Solar Hydrogen Generation Solar Hydrogen Integrated Nano Electrolysis (SHINE) Producing hydrogen with water and sunlight, in imitation of photosynthesis This project aims to develop a hydrogen production system using sunlight in an integrated manner with earth abundant materials mimicking natural photosynthesis. PhotoElectroChemical (PEC) systems use semi-conductor materials to absorb photons from the sun to generate a potential high enough (>1.2 V) to split water and produce hydrogen and oxygen at an integrated electrolysis cell. A major advantage of PEC systems over systems composed of photovoltaic panels (PV) in conjunction to a separate electrolyzer is their integral approach, i.e. the PV cell is part of the electrolyzer. This provides opportunities not only for cost reduction but also for improvement in the efficiency of the electrochemical reaction. There is no doubt that there are serious unresolved issues present with state-of-the-art PEC components regarding their efficiency, cost, and durability. Much research effort has been devoted to the development of components of a PEC system (e.g. nanoPEC European program http://nanopec.epfl.ch/), but relatively little attention has been paid to the engineering-design aspects of a complete PEC system. Nevertheless, the system design aspect is crucial because the material combinations that provide optimal performance depend significantly on the architecture of the reactor itself. Similarly, the operational conditions define usable material combinations. We believe that leveraging the existing silicon photovoltaic knowhow in Switzerland and focusing on a system’s engineering approach for manufacturing hydrogen via PEC will provide the tools to become an important player in a renewable-based fuel economy. Specifically, we propose a system’s engineering approach for realizing a PEC system with: · Photoharvesting electrodes based on amorphous and crystalline silicon cells developed in Prof. Ballif’s group at CSEM which develops stable processes, oriented towards industry. · PEC cell design inspired by fuel cell technology. · Operation under concentrated sunlight. Because of sunlight concentration (>10x), the reactor PV cells are smaller, more efficient and cheaper since less silicon semi-conductor material is used. Michelin research center is bringing a considerable practical experience in fuel cell and electrolysis in this project. The proposed system will make use of the full energy content of the solar spectrum by using the visible part of the spectrum (400 – 1000 nm) to illuminate the PV cell and the rest of the spectrum to self-align the concentrator and heat water to create water vapor near room temperature for the feedstock of the PEC cell. It is expected that the results of this project will provide the design tools and the technology blocks to produce efficient and cost effective sun-to-fuel systems. Partner institutions: EPFL, EMPA, CSEM, Michelin Please check out the diagram: http://lapd.epfl.ch/files/content/sites/lapd/files/SHINE.png