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Dustin Carey

Jul 15, 2015
09:05

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Hi Johnnie, Welcome to the Other Developed Countries contest. Thanks for starting your proposal, and I hope you will continue to build on it. Your geoengineering proposal is certainly interesting. Though while I have read that small volcanic eruptions have contributed to the recent so-called hiatus, I think you're discounting the role the accumulation of heat in the deep ocean is playing. I would be interested in seeing further development of your geoengineering idea, including the physical calculations which suggests that this may offset 60% of carbon emissions, the uncertainties surrounding the proposal (e.g. if wind patterns lead to a concentration of cloud development over certain paths downwind of the utilized active magma sources, how effective would it actually be compared to a more global increase in cloud cover, etc). However, the Other Developed Counties contest is not intended to showcase a single component of a holistic climate strategy. I hope you will draw on the past sectoral contest proposals in order to develop a strategy which incorporates the role of industry, energy systems, adaptation, etc, so as to complete this proposal. If you have any questions, please be sure to ask. Best, Dustin Fellow, MIT Climate CoLab

Johnnie Buttram

Jul 15, 2015
11:27

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Dear Dustin Carey, Thank you for your comment. Although I am still in the . . Under development. . phase of my proposal . . I will answer the assumption that I am discounting the role of the accumulation of heat is playing in the deep ocean. Every time a volcano erupts totally submerged under water - I assume the major portion the major portion of the heat and associated debris is absorbed by the body of water. If a land based volcano erupts the major portion of the heat and debris is absorbed and scattered into the atmosphere. As just one example . . today 2015 somewhere on the Hawaiian island chain volcanic magma cascades from the land into the ocean creating a roaring vapor. Research highly indicates that when drops of water fall on a stone with a temperature of over 2,000+ degrees F this interaction displaces the oxygen, which causes the water to vaporize and expand over 4,000 times. This natural phenomenon creates an atmosphere that is conducive to help form white,maritime, stratocumulus clouds. These clouds have the potential to reflect the incident Sun's rays back out into space and help cool Planet Earth! It makes common sense to utilize this phenomenon for the human good! Thank you for your time, Johnnie Buttram

Dustin Carey

Jul 24, 2015
10:44

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Thank you for your contest entry. We have looked at your proposal and found that it contained intriguing elements; however, it has not been reviewed in this first round because it does not address the contest prompt. We encourage you to review the contest resources page and to keep developing your idea before the August 31 deadline. You can also transfer your proposal to a more relevant contest or to the Proposal Workspace to re-open it, make edits, add collaborators, and even submit it into a future contest. You can do so by logging into your account, opening your proposal, selecting the Admin tab, and clicking “Move proposal” or “Copy proposals”. Reach out to us if you have any questions about how to complete your proposal. All the best, 2015 Climate CoLab Fellows Additional comments from the Fellows: Hi Johnnie, Thanks again for your contest entry. We have looked at your proposal and found that it contained intriguing elements; however, it has not been reviewed by the Judges in this first round because it does not address the contest prompt. I’d be interested in reading your ideas for specific program elements that could be implemented in non-US/EU OECD nations. Japan, for instance, is situated on the ring of fire; would it then be an optimal testing ground for your proposal? How would other nations support this? Reading your proposal, the connection to migration via the offsetting of anthropogenic climate change seems too removed to be directly included in the title. Rather, you’re proposing a novel approach to solar radiation management geoengineering – one I have come across in the scientific literature. As such, I believe your proposal might be better suited for the Geoengineering Workspace. You can move your proposal to this workspace by logging into your account, opening your proposal, selecting the Admin tab, and clicking "Move proposal" or "Copy proposals." On the other hand, if you are proposing a joint solution (geoengineering with a specific humanitarian approach), as your title suggests, here's one way you could approach it: (1) Start a proposal in the global contest that outlines your strategy: to implement a geoengineering approach along with the adaptation approach, just in case no movement happens by decision-makers (2) In the global proposal, link in a geoengineering proposal that specifically details the geoengineering approach and suggest how it could be implemented (3) Create proposals in relevant regional contests that address how the adaptation efforts would specifically be implemented in and impact that region. In these proposals, link in any other adaptation proposals that are relevant, as well as detail any special role that that country/region could have in the geoengineering effort. (4) Link these regional proposals into the global contest. I hope you will continue to develop your idea until the submission deadline, August 31. The deadline for the Global contest is October 17, 2015. If you have any question, please be sure to ask Best, Dustin Fellow, MIT Climate CoLab

Johnnie Buttram

Jul 25, 2015
09:11

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Dear Dustin Carey, Thank you for your comments! I am now in a re-development phase under a new title, Cooling Climate Change in Developed Countries! Thanks again for you time and helpful comments, Johnnie Buttram

Dustin Carey

Jul 26, 2015
01:58

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I'm very pleased to hear it! I look forward to reading the next iteration
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