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Andrea Maggiani

Mar 17, 2015
04:23

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do you consider to use in your model the carbon finance,

Alex Arila

Mar 18, 2015
04:57

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@carbonsink,my idea is to raise the forest cover by advocating for an alternative source of woodfuel. So in the long run carbon finance model will automatically set in

Alex Arila

Mar 18, 2015
04:27

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I need you guys to go through the proposal and bring up more comments and suggestions

Hemant Wagh

Mar 20, 2015
03:36

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Why exclude human waste and insist only on animal waste !! The human excreta could also be a good source of both manure and biogas, so as well the kitchen waste. However, spare the fruit-seeds and don't consider it as waste. They could be used better, a proposal suggests this; link to it is below- https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1300103/planId/1310401 kindly utilize the idea integrating it with your effort. Thanks..

Hemant Wagh

Mar 20, 2015
08:19

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By the way, human urine is mostly sterile, unless a person suffers from urinary infection. Most microorganisms causing urine infection reside on human body. Therefore urine could very well be considered safe to use as/for fertilizer purposes.

Hemant Wagh

Mar 20, 2015
08:16

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Moreover, people these days are talking quite enthusiastically about Human Fecal Transplant !!

Alex Arila

Mar 23, 2015
04:24

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@waghhm,I just took time to ponder over your suggestion of human waste and urine. To start with, human waste is highly dangerous and health risk compared to animal waste. It requires skilled expertise and as such I'm obliged to redesign my proposal so as to consider using human waste. Putting all factors together, including but not limited to the literacy levels of most rural residents, it appears that a sensitization program is prerequisite.

Alex Arila

Mar 23, 2015
04:27

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Using animal waste is suitable in this scenario because of the following; The population density of most rural areas in Kenya and the East African region is not sufficient enough to yield adequate human waste for gas generation. Also the settlement pattern in such areas is scattered hence the difficulty in collecting the waste. I therefore strongly support for the utilization of human waste at trading centers, urban areas and other places with substantive population so as to be sure with the requisite amount of waste able to generate gas.

Osero Shadrack Tengeya

Mar 23, 2015
11:05

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Hi, thanks for submiting your proposal in the climate colab. I look forward to read your fully developed proposal. Have gone through your idea, and it looks much compelling. I'll like to comment on the following: 1. Our country (Kenya)has some policies on biogas generation which are being executed by KENFAP, and other development patners. Kindly consider to find ways you will form patnerships with this agencies so as to ensure success of your idea. Also, address issues related to sustainability, accountability and ownership this programme. 2. Elucidate on ways you intend to work with other stakeholders to make your idea more novel and ensure you incorporate long term costs of your proposed work. Good luck.

Hemant Wagh

Mar 23, 2015
11:00

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Who is more healthy ! Human beings or animals ! Kindly go through the following and oblige. https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1300206/planId/1002

Hemant Wagh

Mar 23, 2015
11:13

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Besides, the scattered setlements would pose a problem for the collection of animal waste as well. There are ways in which the human wxcreta could as well be used on a smaller scale kind of situations.

Hemant Wagh

Mar 23, 2015
11:52

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Kindly go through the following and oblige. https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1300206/planId/1306816 Sincere Regards.

Hemstone Ongidi

Mar 28, 2015
07:57

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@Tengeya, thank you for your suggestion. I'm working on a plan that will enable other stakeholders to come on board. Please share more on the same if you have an idea.

Alex Arila

Mar 28, 2015
09:07

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@Waghhm,thank you for the reference, its quite resourceful. Keep sharing your views

Alex Arila

Mar 28, 2015
09:20

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Keep sharing ideas @Tengeya

Alex Arila

Mar 29, 2015
04:22

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Hey guys after a consideration of incorporating human waste in the proposal, the following technical challenges came about; 1. The Kenya National Domestic Biogas Program, (KENDBIP) launched in 2009 had a four year objective of empowering local farmers who rear livestock to be able to harness biogas energy from livestock waste only. 2. Currently, Kenya National Farmers’ Federation (KENAFF)is the entity that coordinates domestic biogas programs in the country and as such they are currently not having any plans of harnessing biogas energy from human waste. (They haven't introduced the program) 3. Harnessing of biogas energy from animal waste in Kenya currently is being undertaken by individual proprietors and some entities within the private sector and therefore there isn't any national program to coordinate the activity. I therefore need you guys to float in suggestions on how to go about it because my initial plan had targeted rural communities that are mostly livestock rearing.

Alex Arila

Mar 30, 2015
06:07

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I need to attach a table showing a timeline breakdown but I'm finding difficulties, anybody with an idea?

Angela Rita

Apr 11, 2015
05:33

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Not a bad idea

Hemant Wagh

May 8, 2015
04:58

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Kindly go through the following proposal and utilize it to reinforce your theme. Link is below. https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1301416/phaseId/1303167/planId/1310401

Alex Arila

May 10, 2015
10:37

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@waghhm, thanks

Alex Arila

May 10, 2015
10:49

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I need to attach a table, guys how do I go about it

Olawale Olaniyan

May 13, 2015
01:16

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Hi, This proposal looks great. The idea of 50:50 contribution to the cost of installing a biogas production system is good from the perspective of sustainability. One of the challenges from similar projects implemented in a country like Uganda is how to continuously get animal manure for feeding the system. You may want to consider how to overcome this bottleneck in your proposal. Also, you can have a look at the following link: http://www.afri-flame.net/ Best wishes, Olaniyan MIT catalyst

Alex Arila

May 19, 2015
03:20

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@olaniyan, Thank you....working on your suggestion now...

Hemant Wagh

Jun 4, 2015
10:57

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Kindly go through the following plan and try to use it in your efforts... It would help common people.. https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1301416/planId/1310401

Stevie Harison

Jun 12, 2015
04:58

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Hello from Indonesia, Good luck for your project proposal. Just review and make it completed before meet deadline tomorrow. Thank you,

Dan Whittet

Jul 16, 2015
10:13

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This is a fantastic proposal because it solves a problem with a positive using only a simple natural process. Leveraging animal waste keeps it simpler, I response to previous commenters who asked about human waste, I have seen human waste used as a composting product but feel the human waste would be better isolated from these energy biogas digesters. One symbiosis to the digester network I can imagine would be incorporating some aspect of soil regeneration. (For example, the "rhyzobially based extracellular poly saccharides carbon sequestration" discussed in this proposal. https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1302401/planId/1321402 Imagine a network of energy production bio digesters connected with grazing land that incorporates sophisticated carbon sequestration. This is of course a natural solution to a problem caused by humans. One question I have relates to water requirements for the systemes to work. Will water be available? Can it be harvested from the air as part of the project?

Alex Arila

Aug 4, 2015
03:14

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Thank you judges.

Alex Arila

Aug 4, 2015
03:22

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About 75% of the households in the study area rare livestock, this promises a continued potential of biogas generation for the foreseen future.

Alex Arila

Aug 4, 2015
03:02

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The study area also boasts of the best enabling climatic conditions for Biogas generation. The rolling out of the pilot schemes will potentially create advocacy platforms for the development of gas harvesting from human waste. This is because some households in the suburban capital of Kenya, Nairobi, have started using methane harnessed from human waste. More importantly, the application of GIS technology will ease the monitoring the development of the project as it will have remote ability in gathering spatially referenced data.

Peter Kemboi

Aug 5, 2015
04:52

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can someone brief me on carbon finance... and how in relation to sustainable energy

Graham Knight

Sep 14, 2015
08:57

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I am surprised that no-one has yet mentioned problems with existing cow manure digesters!

Most of the larger NGOs no longer promote such digesters as most stop working after a few months. So far I've not found any explication for these failures but . as an engineer, it is not difficult to guess what the problem is!

Some commercial firms are working on cactus-fuelled digesters which have any number of advantages over cow manure including minimum water requirements.


Alex Arila

Sep 15, 2015
03:45

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@grahamk Empirical evidence suggests that fixed dome digesters built with concrete are permanent structures that can last for up to 30 years. You can get the research findings at:

http://practicalaction.org/biogas-fuel

http://www.desire-his.eu/en/boteti-botswana/367-biogas-experimental-results-and-conclusions

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biogas

Thank you..


Alex Arila

Sep 15, 2015
03:40

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@peterkimc there is a report on Carbon finance and sustainable development at

http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/2015/05/24537781/climate-carbon-finance-sustainable-development-2014-annual-report

Have a look to see if you can get answers.

Thank you.


Graham Knight

Sep 18, 2015
05:06

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Hi asigealex,

The links you listed above are not working.

As Practical Action have none nothing with biogas for many years that does not surprise me!

None of the NGOs want to admit there is a problem!!

I have been researching biogas for some time and have uncovered the fact that though many dome digesters have been built few work after a few months! Do have a look at: 

http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:661963/FULLTEXT01.pdf

Here is the summary:

Global concerns of climate change, increased greenhouse gas emissions and security of energy supply have accelerated the search for alternative energy sources both in developed and developing countries. Developing countries are now embracing utilization of biogas as a renewable energy option to meet some of their cooking and lighting needs. In Uganda, despite the introduction of biogas in the 1950’s, the technology has not received considerable acceptance and as a result its penetration has remained relatively low. Several installed biogas plants have failed and those working are not working to the expectation of the technicians and their owners. This research presents results of the study carried out to establish the performance of farm based biogas systems so as to assess the challenges faced by the users and to identify the possible causes of failure for the non-operational systems. A survey of 144 biogas plants was carried out after which performance monitoring of selected digesters in the districts of Luwero, Kampala, Wakiso, Mbale, Jinja and Mukono. It was found that 55% of the surveyed biogas plants were not operational and others not performing to the users expectations. Most of the plants monitored were operating in the temperature range of 18°C-25°C with the gas quality ranging between 50-60% methane. Most digesters showed evidence of high organic loading rates indicated by traces of biogas at the expansion chamber. The identified causes of failure were poor system maintenance, poor workmanship during construction works, poor operation practices, availability of other cheap fuel alternatives, laziness and lack of interest amongst the users, lack of alternative sources of feedstock and system blockages. Furthermore, there is need to sensitize people on the need for using alternative sources of energy such as biogas and improved cooking stoves for fuel saving as most of them use wood and charcoal as supplementary fuels. This would reduce global warming through reduced deforestation and bring about environmental sustainability as a whole.

 


Alex Arila

Sep 19, 2015
04:39

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Thank you grahamk for the insights, I highly appreciate your contribution. This probably means that more research work should be undertaken in this field, more than the findings we have now!

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