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Please find below the judging results for your proposal.

Finalist Evaluation

Judges'' comments


Thank you for participating in the 2015 Climate CoLab Shifting Attitudes & Behavior contest, and for the time you spent in creating and revising your entry.

The Judges have strongly considered your proposal in this second round of evaluation, and have chosen to not advance it as a Finalist for this contest.

We, the Judges and contest Fellows, are truly grateful for your contribution to the Climate CoLab and for your commitment to address climate change.

We encourage you to keep developing your work. Transfer it to the Proposal Workspace to re-open it, make edits, add collaborators, and even submit it into a future contest. You can do so by logging into your account, opening your proposal, selecting the Admin tab, and clicking “Move proposal”.

We hope you will stay involved in the Climate CoLab community. Please support and comment on proposals that have been named Finalists and vote for which proposal you would like to be nominated as the contest’s Popular Choice Winner.

If you have questions, please contact the Climate CoLab staff at admin@climatecolab.org

Keep up the great work. And thank you again for being a part of this mission to harness the world’s collective efforts to develop and share innovative climate change solutions.

2015 Climate CoLab Judges

Additional Comments:

-I like this idea and with very carefully constructed surveys and targeted questions, crowdsourcing information gathering could be powerful. My concern is around the technical expertise needed to assess local and regional impacts, whether or not there will be sufficient incentive to engage experts, the potential for citizens to provide incorrect/biased information, and (in my experience) the limited knowledge most citizens have about what their local (or even worse, state and national) governments are doing to address climate change. Many sustainability offices in municipal governments would have (or be interested in collecting) much of the information described here. Many are also going to considerable effort to engage stakeholders and building their own online portals with information for the community. I'm unclear as to how this would dovetail with those efforts. I think it is important to reinforce, not reinvent, local governments' efforts, which a project like this might be able to achieve.

-This project needs a high-profile sponsor, perhaps via a foundation or non-profit that is focused on climate change solutions. Pitch it to ClimateTruth.org, Environmental Defense Fund, NRDC, or another NGO.

I am worried that Climate Space too closely resembles (and somewhat duplicates) the solid and serious work that's already in motion. I strongly recommend that this team finds a home that's already in motion.


-I continue to be very excited by this proposal, which was strengthened by the recent modifications. I encouraged the proposers to be more ambitious, and they listened, although perhaps their more ambitious stance has made some of their time line projections a bit less realistic (it is highly unlikely that every community in America will conduct an assessment within three years.

One minor bit of advice to the proposers: Yes, your approach will harness crowd-sourcing, but rather than state that "crowds" will contribute to the assessments, I suggest you say that "concerned citizens" will contribute to the assessments. The latter is both more accurate, and more appealing.

Semi-Finalist Evaluation

Judges'' ratings


Novelty:
Feasibility:
Impact:
Presentation:

Judges'' comments


Your proposal has been selected as a Semi-Finalist!

Congratulations! Your proposal,Crowdscoring Place: Engaging Crowds to Assess Local Risk & Readiness in the Shifting Attitudes & Behavior contest, has been selected to advance to the Semi-Finalists round.

You will be able to revise your proposal and add new collaborators if you wish, from July 1st until July 14, 2015 at 23:59pm Eastern Time.

Judges' feedback are posted under the "Evaluation" tab of your proposal. Please incorporate this feedback in your revisions, or your proposal may not be advanced to the Finalists round. We ask you to also summarize the changes that you made in the comment section of the Evaluation tab.

At the revision deadline listed below, your proposal will be locked and considered in final form. The Judges will undergo another round of evaluation to ensure that Semi-Finalist proposals have addressed the feedback given, and select which proposals will continue to the Finalists round. Finalists are eligible for the contest’s Judges Choice award, as well as for public voting to select the contest’s Popular Choice award.

Thank you for your great work and again, congratulations!



2015 Climate CoLab Judges

Judge's comments-

Your proposal is thoughtfully written with intriguing elements. While your timeline looks realistic, the judges encourage you to be a bit more ambitious given the potential importance of your terrific project.

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Steve Thompson

Jul 14, 2015
10:23

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The Climate Place Project Team appreciates the thoughtful feedback provided by the judges and their investment of time reviewing all the projects. We have revised our proposal in response to the judges’ comments. They wrote, “While your timeline looks realistic, the judges encourage you to be a bit more ambitious given the potential importance of your terrific project.” In response to these comments, we have added four new contributors to our diverse team since July 1, enabling us to accelerate implementation of the plan. Under this revision, we propose to initiate all six action items by September 2016, and we have condensed the timeline for full rollout into a four-year window. The most ambitious component of our plan is to mobilize a small army of citizen researchers to assess and score community adaptive capacity, utilizing and revising as necessary a community preparedness scoring methodology developed by two of our European team members and their colleagues. We have expanded the project team to enable us to hit the ground running on this part of the project. One of our new contributors, Diana Reckien from University of Twente and Columbia University, led a team that has assessed community adaptive capacity in 200 European cities. She and UK community preparedness researcher Oliver Heidrich have offered to help develop an assessment instrument that can be applied by citizen researchers in the U.S. Two other new contributors, Eric Sawtelle in Montana and Elizabeth Dowey in Massachusetts, are secondary and post-secondary science and math instructors who will review the survey instrument from the perspective of student groups or classes that may apply it on the ground utilizing GIS mapping technologies provided by our partners at ESRI. They also will beta test the instrument through real-world application in their communities. Our academic research partners are interested in evaluating the effectiveness of a crowdsourcing strategy to measure community preparedness. For a subset of communities evaluated by citizen researchers, they also propose to conduct parallel research and cross-analysis by academic researchers for the purposes of quality control and refinement of the citizen research methods. Conversely, our European partners would like to test our crowdsourcing methodology in EU nations. We’ve further revised the proposal to respond to some readers’ confusion about our use of terminology. We have more clearly summarized the answer to the key questions of who, what, where, when, why and how. I’d like to add an aside for consideration and feedback from MIT’s Center for Collective Intelligence and its partners. In the process of building our team and revising our proposal, we’ve reflected on the MIT Climate Co-Lab’s operating theory that modest financial awards can serve as inducements for citizens to participate in a crowdsourcing platform. We suspect that this might also be true for the crowdscoring platform we envision. In particular, we would be interested in raising a fund that would offer a modest contribution of $250-500 to teacher activity accounts for classes or school clubs that participate in Action 2. This would offset transportation or other costs that may be incurred during the project and directly address one of the persistent obstacles that often preclude schools from participating in extra-curricular activities.

Steve Thompson

Jul 29, 2015
08:32

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In both the content of our proposal and through the process of developing our concept, the Climate Place Project has fully embraced the Climate Co-Lab spirit of crowdsourcing climate solutions. Our proposal has evolved through the collaborative involvement of team members, which has grown to 13 people from across the U.S. and Europe. Team members participate from Montana, California, Massachusetts, Arizona, Washington State, Great Britain, and the Netherlands. The impressive professional biographies and breadth of experience of this team is not fully captured in the contributor profiles posted by these 13 contributors. So in one place, here is a brief biographical sketch of the Climate Place Project Team, ordered alphabetically. Cody Benkelman is Product Manager for Mapping and Charting Solutions at ESRI. ESRI has offered to build a prototype of a modern mapping site if this proposal moves forward to implementation. The mapping site would include access to a variety of existing data layers, including public data available through NOAA's National Climatic Data Center, and the ability to share interactive maps with users on desktop, web, and mobile devices. The platform would allow users to input crowdsourced data developed under Action 2. Mikhail Chester is Assistant Professor of Civil, Environmental, and Sustainability Engineering at Arizona State University. He runs a research lab focused on infrastructure design and climate vulnerability. His group largely focuses on questions of heat vulnerability and how the design of infrastructure can contribute to social vulnerability. Elizabeth Dowey is a math instructor for Northeastern University Foundation Year in Massachusetts. She is the mother of two boys. She’s interested in how we get the media to integrate talk of climate change as deeply as they integrate talk of the economy. She also has submitted a separate proposal to the Climate Co-Lab: Break climate conversation out of its shell! Elizabeth will work with colleagues to develop and beta test a community preparedness scoring methodology that can be applied by high school and post-secondary students in the United States. Oliver Heidrich is a Senior Researcher in Urban Resource Modelling at Newcastle University in the UK. He has been a practicing civil engineer for more than 20 years. He has developed new approaches in modelling life cycle assessments in urban environments, especially in relation to climate impacts, transport and the built environment. He was the lead author of an article in Climatic Change journal about development and implementation of methods to assess community preparedness for climate change. Together with Diana Reckien, he will help the Climate Place Project adapt the Europe-focused methodology for crowdsourcing community assessments in the U.S. Steve Loken is the founder and owner of Loken Builders, a green building and development company in Missoula, Montana. He is a member of the Climate Realty team where he is helping produce risk and readiness assessments and serves as an instructor for a continuing education course for real estate professionals. Diana Reckien is an Assistant Professor for Climate Change at the University of Twente in the Netherlands in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Geo-Information Management. Her work there focuses on social issues related to climate change, including the impact on cities. She is an affiliated researcher at the Earth Institute, Columbia University. She is the lead author of a paper in Climatic Change that analyzed climate adaptation and mitigation plans from 200 urban areas in 11 countries. Together with Heidrich, she will help the Climate Place Project adapt the European methodology for crowdsourcing community preparedness assessments in the U.S. Nikki Reed teaches high school in Whitefish, Montana. She and her colleague, Eric Sawtelle, are leading a community effort to develop a greenhouse and renewable energy systems at a new high school. They provide faculty leadership for the school’s Environmental Club, Project Freeflow and GIS activities. They will work with the team to develop and beta test a community preparedness scoring methodology that can be applied by high school students in the United States. Brett Rosenberg, currently a sustainability consultant in Missoula, MT, is a former sustainability director for the American Institute of Architects. Brett has also worked with many dozens of mayors and cities across the US in committing to and undertaking local actions that reduce the causes and impacts of global climate change. He is a member of the Climate Realty team where he is helping produce risk and readiness assessments and serves as an instructor for a continuing education course for real estate professionals. Steven Running is a Regents Professor of Ecology at the University of Montana and a member of the International Panel on Climate Change. He directs the Numerical Terradynamic Simulation Group (NTSG), a research laboratory pioneering new approaches for ecological and hydrological analyses. Using computational process modeling, satellite remote sensing and GIS, NTSG applies ecological theory and environmental analysis to understand how terrestrial vegetation responds to climate variability. He is a member of the Climate Realty team where he is helping produce risk and readiness assessments and serves as an instructor for a continuing education course for real estate professionals. Eric Salathé is an Associate Professor of Climate Science and an Adjunct Associate Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington. He is the UW Director of the Northwest Climate Science Center and a principal of UW's Climate Impacts Group. The primary focus of his research work is to transform global climate change simulations into information suitable for studying regional impacts of climate change. He is a member of the Climate Realty team where he is helping produce risk and readiness assessments. Eric Sawtelle teaches high school in Whitefish, Montana. He and his colleague, Nikki Reed, are leading a community effort to develop a greenhouse and renewable energy systems at a new high school. They provide faculty leadership for the school’s Environmental Club, Project Freeflow and GIS activities. They will work with the team to develop and beta test a community preparedness scoring methodology that can be applied by high school students in the United States. Steve Thompson founded Climate Realty LLC in August 2014 and the Climate Place Project in April 2015. A former journalist, he has held leadership positions in Montana's non-profit conservation community for 24 years. He has been a journalist, philanthropic advisor and writer/editor for National Geographic Maps. He has a sociology degree from Cornell University. He leads the Climate Realty team producing risk and readiness assessments and serves as an instructor for a continuing education course for real estate professionals. Laurie Yung is an Associate Professor of Natural Resource Social Science in the Department of Society and Conservation at the University of Montana College of Forestry and Conservation. She directs the College's Resource Conservation Program. Among her research priorities is a project to assess community and social vulnerability and adaptive capacity in the context of climate change. She co-directs the Community Vulnerability Working Group, a collaboration with the US Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station to build knowledge of social vulnerability and better integrate that knowledge into decision-making, especially in a rural context. She is a member of the Climate Realty team where she is helping produce risk and readiness assessments.

Steve Thompson

Jul 29, 2015
08:16

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In case the team of judges is still monitoring comments from semi-finalists, I wanted to let you know that our project website at the Climate.Place domain is nearly ready to launch. We're still making final content tweaks and have a bit more programming to complete. But we're close enough to share the working version of Climate.Place prior to pushing it live in the next 2-4 days. You can view the working page at this url: http://74.220.207.110/~climater/

Steve Thompson

Jul 29, 2015
08:58

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I just posted two additional comments here, then noticed the judges' post that our proposal has not been selected as a finalist. Thank you for considering our proposal.