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Please find below the judging results for your proposal.

Finalist Evaluation

Judges'' comments


This proposal presents a nice use of modeling tools to help improve public acceptance. In fact, EPA has the Stormwater Calculator (https://www.epa.gov/water-research/national-stormwater-calculator) which is similar, although probably not the focus specifically on phosphorus.

However, it is not clear that this rises to the level of some of the global challenges proposed, but it should be considered by the entity coordinating the Charles River Watershed compliance (assuming there is one). The case study after implementation would potentially be a good story to tell in other watersheds.

Moreover, there is no clear link with climate change and climate adaptation – more of a ‘business as usual’ case in the context of environmental issues. No links have been made if phosphorus load or associated problems are on increase in the climate change scenario in the watersheds of the Charles River. It is a good use of modelling tools but limited in its geographic applicability.

Finally, the authors didn't address any of the comments from the last round, which limited the proposals improvement.

Semi-Finalist Evaluation

Judges'' ratings


Novelty:
Feasibility:
Impact:
Presentation:

Judges'' comments


Dear proposal authors,

Thank you for your work on this very important issue. We're proud of your proposal, and we hope that you are too. Again, congratulations! Please see below the following comments to enhance your proposal.

All the best,
2016 Climate CoLab Judges

COMMENTS:

Nice use of modeling tools to help improve public acceptance. EPA has the Stormwater Calculator (https://www.epa.gov/water-research/national-stormwater-calculator) which is similar, probably not the focus specifically on phosphorus. I'm not sure this rises to the level of some of the global challenges proposed, but it should be considered by the entity coordinating the Charles River Watershed compliance (assuming there is 1). The case study after implementation would potentially be a good story to tell in other watersheds.

The overall goal - decision support planning for green infrastructure to reduce nutrient loading in the Charles River - is excellent. Stakeholder engagement will be more than half the task, since building a website that nobody 'wants' or 'knows about' is useless. The authors may wish to note that calculations of efficacy of various solutions will be quite different for 'ordinary' rainfall and 'extreme events'. Boston sewers, for example, are designed to divert from sewage treatment plants and instead overflow into the charles when 'extreme' flooding is occuring. One problem with the design is it is about a century old, and the definition of 'extreme' is certainly changing with the climate. This is a clear, persuasive project idea, based on fairly well known pieces. The biggest challenge that i would see is ensuring that people use the tool, and have sufficient incentives to put in place such green infrastructure.

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