Skip navigation
Share via:

Pitch

This proposal attempts to show how off-the-shelf technology can improve sewage treatment.


Description

Summary

This proposal attempts to show how off-the-shelf technology can improve sewage treatment.

Academic basis:

a) Wastewater treatment for land-based aquaculture: improvements and value-adding alternatives in model systems from Australia

Sarah A. Castine1,4,*, A. David McKinnon2 , Nicholas A. Paul3 , Lindsay A. Trott2 , Rocky de Nys

"[...] Given that upgrading wastewater treatment facilities is costly, we highlight options that have the potential to offset nutrient treatment costs, such as the use of algal biomass for food or energy products, and the recycling of nitrogen and phosphorus via pyrolysis creating products such as biochar and biofuel."

b) A Role for Shellfish Aquaculture in Coastal Nitrogen Management

Julie M. Rose,*,† Suzanne B. Bricker,‡ Mark A. Tedesco,§ and Gary H. Wikfors†

"[...] We believe that shellfish aquaculture can be a cost-effective component of comprehensive strategies to address impairments in estuarine and coastal water quality caused by nitrogen enrichment. Doing so can help attain societal goals for water quality, local food production, and strengthened economies."

Technology:

 



Category of the action

Reducing emissions from waste management


What actions do you propose?

Fish Carbon: Exploring Marine Vertebrate Carbon Services: 

"Fish Carbon provides a direct channel through which governments and the private sector can meet national, regional and global commitments on climate change and sustainability. The recognition and valuation of marine vertebrate carbon services may support policies to improve oceanic carbon function, thereby helping to mitigate climate change, and to improve marine ecosystem management."

The Blue Forests Project:

"Although many advances have been made in the last few years, there are still many challenges associated with unlocking the values of coastal carbon and ecosystem services; and then turning them into revenue and management options. The science still contains many gaps, there are very few ‘proof of concept’ on-the-ground examples around the world, and the international community still does not fully recognize the value of these systems for climate change mitigation or adaptation.

The Blue Forests Project aims to address these challenges through coordinated on-the-ground demonstrations where better coastal ecosystem management is achieved by harnessing the values associated with carbon and ecosystem services, addressing key knowledge gaps, and providing experience and tools for greater global application. This four year project is an initiative of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and co-financed by project partners, and managed by GRID-Arendal, a Norwegian foundation and center collaborating with UNEP."

Engineered approaches to blue carbon:

"A US Department of Energy study from 2001 proposed to replicate a natural process of carbon sequestration in the ocean by combining water rich in CO2 gas with carbonate[CO3-] to produce a bicarbonate [HCO3-] slurry. Practically, the engineered process could involve hydrating the CO2 from power plant flue gas and running it through a porous bed of limestone to ‘fix’ the carbon in a saturated bicarbonate solution. This solution could then be deposited at sea to sink in the deep ocean. The cost of this process, from capture to ocean burial, was estimated to range between $90 to "A US Department of Energy study from 2001 proposed to replicate a natural process of carbon sequestration in the ocean by combining water rich in CO2 gas with carbonate[CO3-] to produce a bicarbonate [HCO3-] slurry. Practically, the engineered process could involve hydrating the CO2 from power plant flue gas and running it through a porous bed of limestone to ‘fix’ the carbon in a saturated bicarbonate solution. This solution could then be deposited at sea to sink in the deep ocean. The cost of this process, from capture to ocean burial, was estimated to range between $90 to $180 per tonne of CO2 and was highly dependent on the distance required to transport limestone, seawater, and the resulting bicarbonate solution.80 per tonne of CO2 and was highly dependent on the distance required to transport limestone, seawater, and the resulting bicarbonate solution.

Expected benefits from bicarbonate production over direct CO2 gas injection would be a significantly lesser increase in ocean acidity and a longer timescale for burial before the captured carbon would be released back to the atmosphere.[43]"

Coastal “blue” carbon A revised guide to supporting coastal wetland programs and projects using climate finance and other financial mechanisms:

Finding the adequate financial support to set up a coastal carbon project or program is not an undemanding task. However, reports like this one, or other tools and resources, are trying to ease the way through the climate finance jungle. Wetland –coastal or other – conservation and restoration efforts are more important than ever, and climate finance can help materialize some real implementation on the ground. Climate change finance, additionally coupled and leveraged through biodiversity finance, offers a suite of funding, as well as a plethora of financial mechanisms to support the conservation and restoration of wetlands worldwide, yet is not easy to get hold off. This report tried to provide the reader interested in coastal carbon activities with a first overview of the types of finance available. The scope and scale as well as the geographical and political situation will determine which mechanism, or which A final word 8 A final word combination of mechanisms, is accessible for the development and implementation of a particular wetland carbon project or program. The stated literature and reading sources provide further insights and details for the reader to engage much deeper with a specific fund and/or financial mechanism. And as a final note, it has to be borne in mind that financing for climate change, biodiversity, and water resources will remain a quickly changing subject matter for quite some years to come; and, therefore, checking the information against the latest on the provided websites is a wise approach.


Who will take these actions?


Where will these actions be taken?


What are other key benefits?

 

11 - 20 JULY 2016, NEW YORK | MINISTERIAL DAYS FROM 18 - 20 JULY

The High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development is United Nations central platform for the follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals, adopted at the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit on 25 September 2015.

The Forum, which adopts a Ministerial Declaration, is expected to start effectively delivering on its mandates to provide political leadership, guidance and recommendations on the 2030 Agenda's implementation and follow-up; keep track of progress; spur coherent policies informed by evidence, science and country experiences; as well as address new and emerging issues.


How much will emissions be reduced or sequestered vs. business as usual levels?


What are the proposal’s costs?

Adaptation Fund

Under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), emission-reduction projects in developing countries can earn certified emission reduction (CER) credits. These credits can be traded and sold by industrialized countries to meet a part of their emission reduction targets under the Kyoto Protocol. Financing for the Adaptation Fund comes mainly from sales of certified emission reductions. The share of proceeds amounts to 2 percent of the value of CERs issued each year for CDM projects.

Global Environment Facility

Asia LEDS

GET FiT Plus

FAO begins deploying “fish magnets” to help Somali coastal communities

Africa Solidarity Trust Fund

Foogle or GAO? Google Earth Director about the partnership with FAO

El Niño impact in Ethiopia and FAO destocking activity

FAO and China launch new South-South Cooperation Program in Democratic Republic of Congo

4th FAO Private Sector Partnerships Dialogue – Highlights from the Event


Time line


Related proposals

Ocean Farming Hydrogen and Hydrogen Fueled Aircraft

Carbon Negative Infrastructure and Economy: A Systems Design/Mngmt Approach

UN Oceanic Resources Conservation and Adaptation Platforms (O.R.C.A. Cities)

Algae Derived Ethylene Produces HDPE Algal Bioreactors: Repeat If Necessary!

 


References