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Souhir Hammami

Jan 6, 2018
04:33

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Dear Acacia Forest Finance 

Tomorrow 07/01/2018 is the last day for proposal creation; I encourage you to complete the remaining parts  Impact/Benefits and Costs/Challenges, even if they are developed elsewhere in the proposal, try to highlight them in these two sections

Best of Luck


Pia Jensen

Jan 6, 2018
04:16

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Not sure this has been thought through enough. Monoculture forestry results in a series of problems, especially when the chosen specimen is an invasive species. Have you considered species diversity? I can think of at least several other specimens that can handle the climate you are working with, especially if practices used in greening the deserts projects are implemented.  (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCynDCcrlTb-kngwi_lC0O-Q/videos .... http://time.com/4851013/china-greening-kubuqi-desert-land-restoration/).


Tom Gard

Jan 7, 2018
06:36

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Thank you very much Souhir Hammami. We appreciate your observation and positive comment. We are addressing the areas you have pointed out as a matter of urgency. Thanks.


Tom Gard

Jan 7, 2018
06:45

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Thank you Pia Jensen. Yes, the Acacia senegal tree species can be invasive if not controlled. We really want to use a local tree species that the population in ASAL areas are already used to. We also looked at the SDGs and thought about the best local tree species to use, taking into account local settings. The Acacia Senegal tree species topped our list of several tree species we could use. We had also looked at the restoration project of China's Kubuki Desert. The project relied on the use of licorice, which would not do well locally. Otherwise, thank you very much.


Pia Jensen

Jan 7, 2018
08:42

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I appreciate the feedback, Tom. I've been doing some reading about ASAL areas and found a number of studies and project reports relevant to your proposal. There are certainly limitations but most of the recommendations are for diverse crop management.

This paper goes into great detail about ASAL forestry projects and states that: "In  areas  with low  rainfall (between  150–300  mm),  legume  crops  are  grown  in  association with Acacia  senegal." www.repository.embuni.ac.ke/bitstream/handle/123456789/509/Agroforestry in the drylands of eastern Africa.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

When I made my first comment I was thinking about Pigeon Pea (provides food and can be used for chop & drop/mulching), the Hyacinth Bean Vine (provides food though the older beans need to be washed several times before cooking and eating; withstands hot climates & provides shade), and dates (provides food, stabilizes soil, provides shade, withstands hot climates). Even Moringa gas some potential. Green cultivation of moringa on arid agricultural land in Saudi Arabia www.actahort.org/books/1158/1158_17.htm. Still thinking diversity would add greater benefits to any rehabilitation project in ASALs. 

Did you know Finland provides Support to the Forest Sector Reform in Kenya www.finland.or.ke/public/default.aspx?nodeid=46392&contentlan=2&culture=en-US

Good luck!

 


Tom Gard

Jan 8, 2018
01:36

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We are very thankful for your feedback. You have provided us with very useful information that we intend to use should our proposal proceed to the semi-final stage. We really appreciate.

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